Wednesday, February 19, 2020

19/02/2020 - Part 2 of my walk.

Maximum temperature in the Charente today 12C, minimum 5C. Rain most of the day not measured as yet.  16km/h north-westerly wind with gusts up to 35 km/h.

Grapes partly pruned, must do ours but we only have one plant!

Our hamlet, looking back over my shoulder.

A surprise visit from a Holly Blue (Celastrina argiolus)...

As above...

As above.

Daisies and a fly.

Mimosa.

Mistletoe.

A stream that is quite often dry, it was running fast here.

Lots of mud around!

Reflections in a puddle, I just happened to like this photo!!

I wonder how much water is in this well.

Sad, but I think this large tree had died so it was probably dangerous.

I hope it was wind blowing this vapour trail and the pilot had not been drinking 😊

Wind turbines in the distance- my pet hate, but thankfully there are not a lot around us.

I think this is winter wheat just coming through.

Another great surprise, a Peacock butterfly (Aglais io).


See also my


26 comments:

  1. Everywhere looks like spring, Diane, quite a contrast to what we see out the window here. But we are now into the second week of February so we are getting close.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is amazing how the weather is changing so quickly I just hope we do not get a late winter. I am now out walking every other day so long as it is not raining and stepping up the distances 🚶‍♀️ Enjoy your week. Diane

      Delete
  2. I'm currently pruning my grapevines. The grapes are a bit different than table grapes. Table grapes get a disease here so we grow a native variety called muscadimes.
    Your pictures were a feast for the eyes as usual. I especially liked the blue butterflies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anne, I still have not had time to get out and prune our grape despite the fact that it will not take long. Just so much going on for the moment, hopefully next week (once Monday is out of the way - Dental Root canal to be done) I will catch up in the garden. Keep well Diane

      Delete
  3. The holly blue and the peacock are beauties!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So good to bee insects back in the garden again, hopefully we will not get a cold spell to spoil it all. Take care Diane

      Delete
  4. Love the way grape vines grow. And that blue moth is beautiful. Was hoping to start seeing things like that around here since it is SPRING but with the weather here that is not happening anytime soon. We have had spring, almost summer like temps then back to winter. Snow flurries tomorrow....CRAZY.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That moth is in fact a butterfly, but it is beautiful. You can keep your snow I prefer our temperatures 😊 Keep warm Diane

      Delete
  5. Hi, I loved this post, I've been most interesting.
    I loved your post, I did not know your blog, do you want to follow us? You already tell me. Cheers

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your visit and comment,much appreciated. Have a good week Diane

      Delete
  6. Hi Diane - wonderful very early Spring photos ... the Holly Blue is just beautiful ...enjoying the early sunshine, as too the Peacock. I too don't like wind-turbines and am not sure they help things ... but that's political and so I'll stay clear. We're just wet! Cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Hilary I agree turbines are political, but we can all have our own thoughts. See my reply to Diane b below.
      So good to see insects back in the garden. Keep well and have a good week Diane

      Delete
  7. Both the Holly Blue and Peacock butterflies are beautiful. Humid weather here, I sweat at the slightest activity.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will be glad when it warms up here but we do not generally get high humidity so it is easier. Keep cool, Diane

      Delete
  8. Oooh 12C tops, that's chilly Diane, to me anyway 😊 Beautiful shots of your lovely French countryside. The Holly Blue butterfly is too gorgeous, my very favourite colour 💙 Enjoyed your reflection shot also ✨

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is cold for me as well but so long as there is not a cold wind then I can cope. It is so good to see the flowers and insects appearing, just hope we do not get a late winter!! Keep well Diane

      Delete
  9. Beautiful signs of Spring. I love the Holly Blue. Have a wonderful weekend Diane. We will be back to rain her but Spring and warmer weather is around the corner.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It should soon warm up for you as well, I am delighted to see signs of spring around here. Keep warm and take care, Diane

      Delete
  10. Beautiful scenes and insects. Would you rather a coal mine to look at than wind turbines? They are ugly but at least cleaner than coal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wind turbines kill birds, bats and other animals. Turbines only last for 20 to 25 years Worn out turbines will cost millions to take down and remove, the average cost to remove one turbine is 302,101 Australian dollars or 200,000 American $. I agree coal is not the answer but what is wrong with solar power or water where it is available. The Kariba Dam supplies 1,626 megawatts (2,181,000 hp) of electricity to parts of both Zambia (the Copperbelt) and Zimbabwe and generates 6,400 gigawatt-hours (23,000 TJ) per annum. Each country has its own power station on the north and south bank of the dam respectively. Sorry I am very anti wind turbines, and nothing is going to change my opinion. You are entitled to your own thoughts on the subject.
      Keep well and have a good week, t'other Diane

      Delete
    2. Dams created throughout the world for hydroelectric power generation are largely viewed as environmental disasters. The Kariba Dam resulted in the worst dam resettlement in history, and parts of the land used for resettlement has been degraded to resemble the edge of the Sahara Desert. Furthermore, low rainfall in recent years has meant that the reservoir is nearly empty and the generation of hydropower may cease. Wind turbines are far from perfect, but they do generate clean energy, and design modifications are constantly being implemented. The most underexplored energy utlliization issue is reduced consumer demand. Domestic over consumption and waste is an unsolved problem.

      Delete
    3. I agree that the resettlement of Kariba was a major problem, but there is no sign of a desert like atmosphere. I was working at the Vet Research Lab for John Condy at the time of the building of the wall, and John and Rupert Fothergill did a sterling job of saving so many animals. Yes there has been low rainfall but at the moment Victoria Falls is flowing well and the river is looking good. I only put it forward as another way to get electricity. As Hilary says it is a political thing and best left alone. Have you ever been to Kariba, I have not been for some time but we had some great game viewing holidays in the area. Spain is now looking so ugly, wind farms everwhere!!

      Delete
  11. Those Holly Blue shots are amazing. I am in favor of wind power but don't see why so many together is needed because they are bad for birds and bats.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are quite beautiful. I am closing the discussion on wind farms it is getting out of hand. They are still my pet hate!! Keep well Diane

      Delete
  12. Outstanding photos Diane, have a great week :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks you Denise you have a good week also. Diane

      Delete

Thanks for taking the time to visit and pass a comment. Every comment is appreciated and I try to reply to each and every one. All comments are verification free but will come to me for approval first :-)) PLEASE DO NOT ADD LINKS TO YOUR OWN WEB ADDRESS FOR OBVIOUS REASONS THEY WILL NOT BE PUBLISHED. THANK YOU FOR YOUR UNDERSTANDING
No anonymous Users!